Nebraska jailhouse witness

Help Protect Innocent Nebraskans From Unreliable Jailhouse Witnesses

Urge your state senator to support LB 352 to protect the innocent against false jailhouse witness testimony.

159 innocent Americans were wrongfully convicted due to false jailhouse witness testimony

Christy Sheppard is a victim advocate and cousin of Debra Sue Carter, who was raped and murdered in Ada, Oklahoma in 1982. Ron Williamson and Dennis Fritz were wrongfully convicted of the crime—partially based on jailhouse witness testimony—and 17 years later DNA proved their innocence and resulted in the conviction of a man named Glenn Gore. Years later, John Grisham published a bestselling book about the case called “The Innocent Man” which has now been adapted for a Netflix series.

“My family was revictimized by the failure of a system that vowed to seek justice in Debbie’s name,” said Sheppard.

“Our world was turned upside down when we learned that two innocent men were behind bars–and Ron Williamson had nearly been executed–while Glenn Gore went on to commit other violent crimes. It’s too easy for jailhouse witnesses to lie and send the wrong men to prison. Our justice system can do better for victims and for the accused.”

“It’s just an extra protection for everyone for the victims and for people who are potentially innocent and it protects the system from informants taking advantage and trading lies for their own benefit,” Sheppard said in a legislative hearing on March 7.

Christy Sheppard testifying in support of LB 352 in Nebraska on March 7, 2019.

Nebraska can be doing more to prevent wrongful convictions, which hurt the innocent, threaten public safety and cost taxpayer money in state compensation and civil lawsuits.

Urge your state senator to support LB 352 to protect the innocent against false jailhouse witness testimony.

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This campaign is in partnership with the Midwest Innocence Project.

 

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